Continuing the Marathon: Working Up A Daily Sweat

MS, like most major chronic diseases, does not have a single cause. Therefore, approaching it from several different angles seems appropriate. Factors such as smoking, alcohol, lifestyle (e.g., non-exercise), and poor nutrition top the list of contributors to the problem along with environmental toxicants such a phthalates which are wide spread.

There is little doubt that this toxicant disrupts the normal functioning of the nervous system during development of the fetus while in the womb. After delivery of the child, and with continued exposure and contact with phthalates in the environment, the disruption continues.

One way to get rid of the toxicant is through sweating. As with running a marathon, sweating is good. So, induce a little sweating during the day that helps slow the process of MS down, stop it, and turn things around.

Dr. Rudy Cartwright
MS Health Coach

24 thoughts on “Continuing the Marathon: Working Up A Daily Sweat

  1. This info, along with so many other aspects of health and healing (MS) troubles me. In one simple internet search, I find that phthalates are used in many pharmaceutical coatings! Curious if this would this include the gel-capped variety or would tablets be included too?

    Again, very discouraging news for what has proven to be a confusing disease!

    Thanks for the information.

  2. I purchased an infra-red sauna to help me to sweat and rid m body of toxins. I could not use it because every time I did, I barely broke a sweat except above my upper lip. I got so weak I had to CRAWL out of the sauna. my Dr. said I could have caused real damage because of the heat build up in my brain! I have not really sweat for over 12 years!

  3. THANK YOU FOR YOUR INFO. I LIVE IN CALGARY AB, BUT I AM WAS BORN IN THE EAST COAST. (NEW BRUNSWICK) SOME DAYS I WISH I WAS BACK THERE ENJOYING THE HUMIDITY, SO I WOULD NOT FEEL SO DRY IN THE AIR & SKIN. SO YES I ALREADY SWEAT A FAIR BIT EVERYDAY. I ALSO EXERCISE EVERYDAY & SWEAT. SO I CAN FEEL ALOT BETTER ABOUT ME!! THANK YOU FOR THE INFO. — JEFF

  4. THANK YOU FOR YOUR INFO. I LIVE IN CALGARY AB, BUT I WAS BORN IN THE EAST COAST. (NEW BRUNSWICK) SOME DAYS I WISH I WAS BACK THERE ENJOYING THE HUMIDITY, SO I WOULD NOT FEEL SO DRY IN THE AIR & SKIN. SO YES I ALREADY SWEAT A FAIR BIT EVERYDAY. I ALSO EXERCISE EVERYDAY & SWEAT. SO I CAN FEEL ALOT BETTER ABOUT ME!! THANK YOU FOR THE INFO. — JEFF

  5. I have read previously that MS patients do not sweat. However, my feet sweat a lot and the odor is not so pleasant. Your comments about sweating have much interest to me. Thank you, Dr. Cartwright.

  6. Try moving to build up a sweat with UTOFFS SYNDROME not easy and as I used to do a lot of keep fit running, weights, and general hard work, but now when I get hot or too warm nowI have a job to move, and extreme cold has an affect too,

  7. I agree 100%! From twenty years old through 35 years old I taught a very strenuous aerobics class, and exercised using free-weights. I had a baby in 1997 (cessarian) and was working out again in two weeks. I am now 52. I was diagnosed in 1997 at the age of 35. I had a car accident two years ago, but am slowly getting back on the exercise wagon…this time not to teach others, but for me and my health. My background is in exercise science … if any of you out there need help with your exercise program, maybe I can help! Have a great day…Sherry

    • Hi Sherry,
      What sort of exercise program would you suggest for someone like me who is really out of shape and overweight. Would love to slim down and get fit but not sure where to start.

      Kind Regards, Christina

    • Hi Sherry, I have been having problems with exercising. My feet feel so tight. Are there any exercises that I can do to help loosen my feet? I would greatly appreciate it if you would let me know. Thank you in advance! Marian

    • Hi Joan, I use a rebounder (mini trampoline). If you can stand it works very well, just bounce up and down a little for 5 – 10 minutes a day.

  8. I am 61 yrs old, MS diagnosed at age 35. I do two weekly one hour chair-based exercise sessions, (as I can’t stand for too long), but they don’t work up a sweat. Walking is difficult, let alone running !! Like Laurence, the warmer weather makes me much less mobile. Fever sweats paralyze me. Try Epsom Salt foot baths to draw toxins out through the feet.

  9. Thank you for the valuable information. I too have a problem. I don’t sweat at all. If I do strenuous excersise I might sweat a tiny bit but then again have to make sure that I don’t over do it. Nevertheless I’m going to keep on doing my treadmill walking…….

  10. I have a crosswalker and can make my heart race but I do not sweat. I am like Laurence, heat and cold intolerant. Renders me unable to move.

  11. When you sweat, you get some toxins out of your system but you also sweat essential minerals. Like Dr. Joel Wallach would say, we need 90 essential nutrients ( from those 90, 60 are essential minerals and many of which cannot be found in our daily diet today unless you make your own organic garden and put some wood ashes in your soil… ). So, this article should be taken with a bit of salt ( himalayan or sea )…. no pun intended !

    • Running a marathon…..??????? Without juicing lots of greens for methylation and detoxification of your liver, amongst other things, and supplementing with essential minerals and with other essential nutrients that sustain life …. you might just die healthy sooner than you think !

  12. Hi Dr. C,
    Thank you for your continued invaluable information.

    As you know, I have MS and live in Arizona where it is already in the 80’s-90’s. We kind of skip Spring and jump straight into summer.

    I have found two solutions to help promote perspiring:
    1. Hot chili peppers have something in them called capsaicin which forces the body to perspire if you eat them. I believe, from the research I have done, that our sympathetic nerves are somehow compromised. (Sympathetic nerves allow your body to perspire and without them you do not perspire). I back this assertion up with my own personal research. I had a Trans Auxilary Dorsel Sympathectomy. All my sympathetic nerves on the right upper quadrant of my body were cut, on purpose by a doctor, to save my right arm. (successfully) So, I do not perspire on that side of my body unless I eat chili peppers (i.e., jalapeno, serano, cayenne, etc.). The more capsaicin in the pepper the more I perspire on the right side, even thought all my sympathetic nerves are severed.

    2. I also was in a MS exercise research study using an ice vest. They found by exercising with an ice vest on, the core of your body stays cool, allowing to exercise longer and with more intensity without getting MS fatigue. I did perspire on the rest of my body while exercising except my upper right hand quadrant.

    3. Lastly, some cooking suggestions…by mixing some sweet fruit like mango, pineapple, orange, grapefruit, watermelon, or cantelope with the chili peppers helps cut down the intensity of the heat of the chili’s. Also, squeezing some lime or lemon on the fruit or on a salad, chicken, or fish with some chili is good too.

    My last little tid bit….Most people use water, which I find useless, but by sucking on a lime or lemon this helps cool your mouth if you eat too hot of a chili. 🙂

    Thank you again Dr. Cartwright to you, Scott, and all others who contribute to the wonderful research being presented by MS Health University.

  13. Had ms for 26 years, a nice slow walk though the fields and along the river bank, listening to Sam Cooke or Bob Marley, is GOOD

  14. Thanks for more info Dr C though I find it strange as it is the heat that slows me right down actually brings me to a standstill.I don’t really know if I sweat much either even though it doesn’t take much to sweat in North Queensland.Also it is autumn down under now which I find much better for me even though I have always loved summer more.

  15. I was diagnosed with ms december 1997. In January 2013, I was diagnosed with arthiritis. The problems that I have dealt with are as follows: numbness in hands and feet, fatigue, imbalance, and what has been most bothersome is my feet feel like rubber bands are wrapped around them and sweezing without relief. Has anyone experienced the feet tightness? If so, would you please let me know what helped you?

      • Thanks for the suggestion. I tried Niacin and the rubber-band feeling in the bottom of my left leg disappeared. Nothing else worked before that!

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